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Introducing our London KidPack!

We are very excited to announce the arrival of our new London KidPack! Joining our ever-successful Paris KidPack, it is full of fun activities, puzzles and creative fun. Add one as a bonus after a family treasure hunt at any of our three London museums, and keep the discovery going!

Learn how to write in Egyptian hieroglyphics with the Rosetta Stone, decorate your own Sutton Hoo Helmet with Norse warriors and gods and spot the differences with Shiva; Destroyer and Lord of the Dance!

We’re rolling it out this winter to celebrate our Public Easter Hunts … Read More

Please use the Search box to your right, alongside the Categories Box, to find what you’re looking for. Though we do have a few categories of typical blog articles (such as the “Travelling with Kids in Paris and London” and “Nearby Food & Wine”) this blog is also meant to help hunters read posts on the museums they’ll be hunting in, in the meantime sometimes reading whole articles on the treasure they’ll be scouting out on their THATMuse.

To find these articles, please look for which museum you’re going to and then, as a subcategory, the theme you’ve chosen. For … Read More

Marble statue of Cupid from British Museum collection

Our final Love Hunt Blog before Valentine’s Day is all about its chubby little mascot: Cupid. Check out the whole series here, here and here!
However our little cherub has a much more storied past, before he was reduced to selling cards and chocolates.

Originally Eros in Greek, the God of Love, in some versions he is one of the oldest forces in the universe, predated only by Chaos and Gaia (Earth).
Most commonly though the Romans knew little Cupid as the son of Venus, Goddess of beauty. Her husband was Vulcan, but Cupid’s father is MarsRead More

Love Hunt: The Ain Sakhri Lovers

Today for our third Love Hunt blog we have a very special object. The oldest and most mysterious object on our Love Hunt: The Ain Sakhri Lovers. Possibly the oldest porn in the world! 
 

The Ain Sakhri Lovers from the British Museum Collection. Small sandstone sculpture of two figures intertwined.

This statue is the oldest known representation of two people making love in the world. It was discovered in the Ain Sakhri caves near Bethlehem and dates back around 11,000 years. At this time, humans we’re only just learning how to move from hunter-gathering to farming and the Natufian people of the Middle East who made this sculpture we’re some … Read More

Thetis and Peleus – Wedding of the Ages 

Welcome to our second Love Hunt blog (see the first here). Read up on the sauciest stories from antiquity and get yourselves some bonus points!

Welcome to the tale of the grandest wedding of the Greek world. Maybe not the loveliest wedding but definitely the most eventful. Full of drama, scandal and family feuds, like all good weddings! 

Painting of Thetis and Peleus's wedding feast by Joachim Wtewael. A busy scene of celebration and debauchery.
Love an outdoor wedding

Thetis was a Sea Nymph admired by Zeus and Poseidon (Remember this for bonus points!) until they discover a prophesy. Her son will be greater than his father. So they decide to marry her off … Read More

Love Hunt: Priapus

Welcome to our new blog series, highlighting the great treasures in our British Museum Love Hunt. Discover some of the most famous lovers in history: Thetis and Peleus, The Ain Sakhri Lovers and Cupid and Psyche. This upright fellow has become a bit of a mascot for our Love Hunt at the British Museum. This…ahem, impressive piece has a hilarious and surprisingly stories history behind it. 

Metal figure with a large erect phallus with bells hanging off. A tintinnabulum depicting Priapus from the British Museum
The Priapus tintinnabulum in the British Museum

Priapus seems to have originated as a minor greek god in Asia Minor, the then greek controlled west coast of modern day turkey, and been particularly worshipped around … Read More

The Louvre courtyard and pyramid illuminated at night
Napoleon courtyard of the Louvre museum at night time, with Ieoh Ming Pei’s pyramid in the middle.

This is either the last or the penultimate post in the Louvre Photo Series. It’s been a pleasure to ponder what images to use for the imminent THATLou website. 

As I touched on in the last post, photographic tastes which I’d long ago forgotten awoke, such as automatically turning to black and white, steering clear of portraiture (unless people are tiny, indecipherable specs in the distance, I’m not really interested in them), looking at shadows, architecture and reflexions, and above all — … Read More

When to book your Louvre Tickets

Booking Louvre Tickets

Before you can begin treasure hunting through the Louvre’s amazing collection, you first have to get inside! The museum has a charge to enter and it is much easier, and much faster to book online in advance, to save you waiting in long boring queues.

The best and cheapest place to get your Louvre entry tickets is at the official Louvre site. If you have booked a Classic or Luxe THATMuse we recommend you book your tickets for 30 minutes after your start time. This allows time for you to meet your THATMuse greeter, who will … Read More

Give the gift of treasure hunting!

Looking for a special gift for a special person? Have friends or family going to London or Paris at Easter, this summer or who may live there? Why not offer up a museum treasure hunt, making explorers of them for some maverick museum fun!


All of our Treasure Hunts are now available for purchase as Gift Certificates!

Simply send us a message on our Contact Us page. If you provide us with the information needed (The museum if decided, names of the gift giver & recipient, a message and of course their email address), … Read More

GIRAFFE START & FINISH POINT

You’ll meet your THATMuse Rep at the Giraffes in the main Hintze Hall. They will have a white canvas THATMuse tote and prior to your hunt their name and contact details will be emailed to you.

Hintze Hall in the Natural History Museum London with giraffes and blue whale skeleton
Meet at the Giraffes on the left!

TOOLS

Freshly charged batteries in your phones/cameras (per team) & comfy shoes.


Your THATMuse Mission

Photo your team in front of as many pieces of Treasure as possible within the given amount of time (90 minutes to 2 hours)!
However, with careful reading you could pick up bonus THATMuse points. … Read More

MEETING POINT

Your first task will be to find our meeting point within the British Museum’s Great Court lobby. If entering the museum from the main entrance on Great Russell St, the circular Information Desk is to the right (within the Great Court); we’ll meet behind the Info Desk, at the Roman equestrian prince statue (photo herewith). Your THATBrit Rep will have a white canvas THATMuse tote.

treasure hunters posing as egyptians in front of roman equestrian statue in the British Museum's great court

TOOLS

Please be sure to have freshly charged batteries in your phone or camera. Please visit the cloak room &/or toilet before our meeting time.

ROLES

  1. Navigator (good with a map)
  2. Scribe (who’s
Read More

AMAZING ACCESSORIES: THE LANGUAGE OF THE FAN

By Masha Voyles

Just a handy hint: the bits in bold might be the answers to bonus questions on your hunt! Buy your tickets to the Fashion Hunt at the V&A here.

If there’s one wardrobe item that I’m praying fashion will eventually bring back, it’s the hand-held fan. They’re greener than air conditioner, a good workout for the arm, and often really, really pretty. There were floral fans, feather fans, ivory fans and printed fans, mask fans and even map fans (which were among the first tourist souvenirs).  

Fans also often had hidden messages in them. This ‘Royalist’ fan, pictured … Read More

HISTORICAL FASHIONISTAS: JOSEPHINE BONAPARTE

By Masha Voyles

Just a handy hint: keep an eye out for answers to bonus questions on your hunt! Buy your tickets to the Fashion Hunt at the V&A here.

The Empress Josephine—Napoleon’s wife—was a massive shopaholic, and was always getting into trouble with her hubby for overspending. On the other hand, this was somewhat unfair, considering the fact that he would then make snarky comments if a woman wore the same dress twice in front of him. It was also part of Josephine’s duty as empress to restore the French luxury industry, which had been all but destroyed during … Read More