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Natural History Museum Cafes
2018 April 19
  • Natural History Museum

Natural History Museum Cafes

Cafes in the Natural History Museum:


The T. Rex Grill
- Located in the Green Zone            
- Hours: 11:00- 16:00 -Very cool display with moving dinos. A large space, great for large or small groups to meet up for score tallying (more of a sit-down place)    -Children welcome! Lots of space
-Offers burgers, steaks and pizzas at a pretty affordable price range- prices £10 and up; also offers desserts


T. Rex Cafe


The Kitchen
- Located in the Red Zone          
-Hours: 10:00 – 17:00
-Very kid friendly- offers lunch and activity packs to keep them entertained while parents eat (or tally up their hunts!) sit down place
-Offers a variety of food from sandwiches, wraps and salads, pizza and burgers; also has dessert options (similar to the coffee house)           
- Prices range from £8.50- £12.50 for adults and £4.25- £5 for the children’s menu (kids under 12)         
- Adult Meal Deal: main, dessert, soft drink for £12.95            
-Kids Meal Deal: main, dessert, soft drink for £8  

The Kitchen

The Coffee House

- Located in the Red Zone (Lasting Impressions Gallery)            
- Hours: 10:00- 17:00            
-Offers pastries and baked goods ranging from £4-£6; perfect for grabbing a quick bite on the hunt (or some caffeine to refuel) or for small groups to score tally; better for on-the-go and for groups without children        

The Coffee House

Central Café
-Located in the Blue Zone            
-Hours: 10:00- 17:30            
-Very family friendly; offers high chairs for babies and toddlers
-Mostly offers sandwiches and salads, but has on the go snacks like crisps and fruit if you need to stop and refuel; this is mostly on-the-go    


Central Cafe

Darwin Centre Café
-Located in the Orange Zone            
-Hours: 10:00- 17:00
-Very similar to the Central Café in terms of food- offers sandwiches and salads for more filling options, but also has crisps and a variety of baked goods like caked and pastries

Darwin center
THATNat: Meeting Point!
2018 March 22
  • Natural History Museum

THATNat: Meeting Point!

On this upcoming Sunday, 25 March, we're launching THATNat- our Treasure Hunt At The Natural History Museum! We'll be meeting for the hunt at 2 pm in the Lower Ground Floor ‘Picnic Area’: If entering Hintze Hall from the Cromwell Rd entrance, place yourself below the belly of the Blue Whale soaring above the lobby. Within Hintze Hall, to the right (Info Desk behind you) pass through the double-doored corridor then hang another sharp right to the stairwell leading down to the Lower Ground Floor (in the ‘Green Zone’ as per the map). Once downstairs, directly after the 'Investigate Centre' you'll find doors to your right marked 'Picnic Area'. Your THATMuse hosts, Bryan & Daisy, will welcome you at the door, with their white canvas THATMuse totes to distinguish them. If you get lost, you can call or text Bryan at +44 (0)7426 440101 & Daisy at +44 (0)7921 589912

The finishing point for this inagural THATNat hunt will be in the Darwin Center, at the bottom of the staircase as shown. To get to the Darwin center, make your way down the same double door hallway across from the information desk, proceed all the way to the end of the hall, past the dinosaur exhibit, and you'll see a sign for the Darwin Center. Walk down the staircase, and we'll be waiting for you at the bottom! Here is a clearly labled map that you can use to help you navigate. 

We can't wait to see you there!
THATNat: Bird or Dinosaur?
2018 March 22
  • Natural History Museum

THATNat: Bird or Dinosaur?

During your THATNat hunt, you’ll likely meet one of the Natural History Museum’s most prized fossils – the archaeopteryx. This winged creature caused quite the stir when it was discovered in the 19th century. Some people actually thought it was an angel. We can see why.

Instead, scientists debated whether it was a dinosaur or a bird. It had wing and bones like a bird, but claws and a snout like a dinosaur. This mishmash of features caused people to evoke the theory put forward by Charles Darwin, one of the UK’s most famous scientists.

The name of this theory is, of course, an answer for some bonus bling during our THATNat hunt, so we won’t give it away just yet.

Dinosaurs, however, were allegedly ancestors of birds. Look at the ostrich feet in the Bird Hall and you’d think it came from a dinosaur called a “raptor” (which means “bird of prey,” by the way). Does it seem possible that these giant reptiles ended were the starting point for today’s flamingos and hawks? It’s not for us to decide. We’ll let the scientists keep discussing it – but, if you are a betting person, the answer is likely yes!

Think about Darwin’s theory, and bring it for an easy answer on the upcoming THATNat hunt, Dinosaurs and Extinct Beasts, on March 25th. There will be plenty of Easter eggs to find, and we’ll usher in the spring with some good old-fashioned fun and games.

THATNat: Human or Ape?
2018 March 22
  • Natural History Museum

THATNat: Human or Ape?

The Beatles had a famous song (at least one) where they sang, “Look for the girl with the sun in her eyes, and she's gone.” They were not talking about the Lucy you’ll meet on your THATNat hunt at the Natural History Museum in London, but imagine this tiny human living many, many years ago. She probably had a few happy moments, with sun in her eyes. Or at least we like to think so.
Lucy was not a human; however, she was not an ape either. So, what was she?

Discovered in Ethiopia, Lucy belongs to a group of pre-human creatures called Australopithecus. There is a lot of speculation about her, but scientists are pretty sure that she is a female – because of her pelvic bone – and that she walked upright like a human. This was a big deal back in the 1970s.

Today we know more about our early ancestors, but of course it’s hard to know a whole lot about Lucy, who lived around 3.2 million years ago. We learn a lot from her, especially from teeth – of which Lucy has precious few left. You’ll find out during the THATNat hunt, Dinosaurs and Extinct Beasts, on March 25th, how many teeth she actually had.

Google it now if you want to have a few bonus points in your pocket when you arrive!

THATNat: Rock or Bone?
2018 March 13
  • Natural History Museum

THATNat: Rock or Bone?

On your THATNat at the Natural History Museum, you’ll come across lots of objects that look like skeletons. Mighty T-Rex skulls, a full Iguanodon, and winged pteranodons. But are the skeletons the same as the skulls of the mammoths and mastodons in the museum’s collection?  

It’s a tricky question – one that we will answer on the hunt, of course!  

Not all fossils are bones. Any trace of a long-dead creature can be a fossil. Footprints are fossils. Bones are fossils. Egg shells are fossils. Even droppings are fossils – and we can learn a lot from them! But don’t expect to find some dino do-do with any organic matter in it. That stuff is long gone.  

Dinosaur remains are millions of years old, and none actually have any cell tissue in them anymore. They aren’t, well, bones. They are simply mineral replications of the bones that they once were. They have the shape and form of bone, but they are essentially rocks. There is a particular process that leads to these bones becoming the fossils you see today.  

If you can find the name of this process (our IG or Twitter @THAT_Muse_ might answer before our big THATNat launch! As would google…), you’ll have some bonus points in your pocket for the upcoming THATNat launch, Dinosaurs and Extinct Beasts, on Sunday 25 March, 2 pm!  

Just in time for Easter, we’ll be celebrating these creatures by bringing them back to life, even if just in our imaginations! Details about our public THATNat launch at the Natural History Museum can be seen on our THATNat launch blog post here.

By Bryan Pirolli
THATMuse launches at Natural History Museum, London
2018 March 07
  • Natural History Museum

THATMuse launches at Natural History Museum, London

It’s official! THATMuse is launching its newest treasure hunt in London, this time at the
Natural History Museum (THATNat). Our first themed hunt, Dinosaurs and Extinct Beasts,
introduces players to the world of dinosaurs, Neanderthals, and even the curious dodo. The
hunt will take place throughout the expansive Natural History Museum, allowing participants
to experience its many galleries and exhibits.
This enormous museum opened in 1881 in South Kensington, the brainchild of Sir Richard
Owen. With so many artefacts piling up in the British Museum, Owen thought it was time to
create a dedicated building to the natural world. An underdog architect Alfred Waterhouse
drew up plans for the museum, with terracotta facades and Romanesque touches that
reflected the Victorian aesthetic of the time. The building itself as fascinating as the
museum’s seemingly endless collection.
Today, the museum holds over 80 million specimens, including bones, meteorites, crystals,
and countless fossils. No visit to London is complete with paying tribute to the massive
dinosaurs, the famous Cheddar Man, or ‘Hope’ the blue whale hanging over Hintze Hall.
Our first THATNat, Dinosaurs and Extinct Beasts, will take visitors through all of the parts
of the museum, including dinosaurs, mammals, geological artefacts, human ancestors, and
Earth science. Through fun and games, you’ll discover the many ways that scientists learn
about extinct creatures while meeting many of these animals in the flesh – or at least in the
bone!
It’s official! THATMuse is launching its newest treasure hunt in London, this time at the Natural History Museum (THATNat). Our first themed hunt, Dinosaurs and Extinct Beasts, introduces players to the world of dinosaurs, Neanderthals, and even the curious dodo. The hunt will take place throughout the expansive Natural History Museum, allowing participants to experience its many galleries and exhibits.

This enormous museum opened in 1881 in South Kensington, and was the brainchild of Sir Richard Owen. With so many artefacts piling up in the British Museum, Owen thought it was time to create a dedicated building to the natural world. An underdog architect, Alfred Waterhouse, drew up plans for the museum, with terracotta facades and Romanesque touches that reflected the Victorian aesthetic of the time. The building itself as fascinating as the museum’s seemingly endless collection.

Today, the museum holds over 80 million specimens, including bones, meteorites, crystals, and countless fossils. No visit to London is complete with paying tribute to the massive dinosaurs, the famous Cheddar Man, or ‘Hope’ the blue whale hanging over Hintze Hall.

Our first THATNat, Dinosaurs and Extinct Beasts, will take visitors through all of the parts of the museum, including dinosaurs, mammals, geological artefacts, human ancestors, and Earth science. Through fun and games, you’ll discover the many ways that scientists learn about extinct creatures while meeting many of these animals in the flesh – or at least in the bone!

Come prepared to look for clues, take silly photos, create some goofy videos, and learn all about the animals and beings that no longer exist, but that are still beloved by kids and adults alike.

After the hunt, return to your favorite part of the museum to continue your adventure and to learn more about the fascinating planet that we call home.
Check back here on the blog, on our Twitter and Instagram feeds (@THAT_Muse_) for teasers & bonus answers posted before the THATNat launch!

INFORMATION:

Sunday, March 25, at 2 PM, we will be hunting at the Natural History Museum. Simply respond to this free invitation HERE (space limited), grab your camera and prepare for some Easter Dino Egg fun on our treasure hunt launch! The hunt lasts roughly 1.5 hours (plus half an hour of prep/score tallying & the all-important prize-giving ceremony before & after) taking you up, down and around the colored zones of the NHM. Be sure to get there early as the security line can be an obstacle as large as the T-Rex! There are cafés for a coffee before our 2 pm meeting time at the Picnic Area. Bryan Pirolli (brainchild of THATNat) and Daisy de Plume (founder of THATMuse) will be waiting for you at the Picnic Area, welcoming teams with their white canvas THATMuse totes to identify them. If you have any questions, feel free to get in touch with us at daisy@thatmuse.com or bryan@thatmuse.com
Photo credit: Diliff